The book of love – the postmodern campus novel 18 years in the making

TRAINsample-smallFollowing the launch of The Girl With the Bomb Inside last month, this month sees the release of  Train Can’t Bring Me Home.

I’m particularly thrilled to publish this as it’s been a  labour of love for the last 18 years: a postmodern campus novel that explores the limits of love, literature and language in a dizzying, intellectual, comic, erotic clash of  literary styles.

It’s experimental but, I hope, a lot of fun.

I started writing Train Can’t Bring Me Home while on a student exchange in Hungary in 1993. The Iron Curtain had just come down and I’d jumped at the chance to witness history up close, a society that had been frozen in time now beginning to thaw.

It was a time of extremes. While a bloody civil war was raging just over the border to the south, I found myself in the Hungarian campus town of Debrecen, escaping into love and literature with a group of students and exiles; a crazy spring semester falling in love with a town and its people and only making sense of it through the books we were all reading.

At the centre of the novel is Dylan, a washed up American lecturer with a Tom Waits fixation, who has an affair with Erzsi, his vivacious teenage Hungarian student, but their affair becomes an all-encompassing passion that transforms everyone around them and turns the entire town into a magical place.

It’s a novel about love but it’s also a novel about novels. It made sense to me to tell the story through the books that the characters were reading and obsessed with, so each chapter is written in a different style and sometimes random styles jump in and take over within chapters.

If you like straight narratives that don’t play literary games, Train Can’t Bring Me Home is probably not for you. But if you fancy the idea of a novel that flits from bad travel writing to music journalism to a relationship break-up written as a student essay, with an array of pastiches of literary greats like James Joyce, Martin Amis, BS Johnson, Italo Calvino, Milan Kundera, Charles Bukowski, William Burroughs, Samuel Beckett, Bram Stoker, Vladimir Nabokov, Gabriel Garcia Marquez and more, then I think you’ll enjoy the games it plays.

Train Can’t Bring Me Home is available in both ebook and paperback editions. For the full list of  buying options – including a signed copy direct from the author, see below…

And if you read it and like it, remember to give it a review.


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Or get a personalised signed paperback :

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Reader comments

“Very impressive, clever, brilliant even…” — Liz Calder

“I just finished your book on the train and quietly cried my eyes out…”

“I was very excited to read this book. I love Tom Waits, have spent time in Hungary and like post-modern British lit. The story keeps your attention and is emotionally gripping. Here comes the but, the author gets too clever for himself. He writes some chapters in different literary styles, one seems to be done in the style of Vonnegut and another in the style of lit. crit. (footnotes and all). This may win points with literary grad students, but to me, it was distracting and almost ruined a beautiful story. That being said, the book was good enough to get me to read another by the author which was much better. If you have ever lived away from your home and felt as if you were living someone else’s life, this is worth reading.”

One thought on “The book of love – the postmodern campus novel 18 years in the making

  1. Pingback: Train Can’t Bring Me Home | Andy Conway

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